Forum für die kritische Würdigung
Forum for critical appreciation
Forum pour une appréciation critique
Foro de apreciación critíca
Aktuelle Zeit: Mi 13. Dez 2017, 00:43

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde




Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 23 Beiträge ]  Gehe zu Seite Vorherige  1, 2
Autor Nachricht
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Mensch G.M.B.H.
BeitragVerfasst: Mi 5. Sep 2012, 08:56 
Offline

Registriert: Sa 12. Dez 2009, 18:31
Beiträge: 1215
Parasites, Modern Life and Immune Systems Gone Haywire (= spielen verrückt)

"According to Velasquez-Manoff and the scientists he writes about, it’s no coincidence. A fast-growing body of research suggests that immune systems, produced by millions of years of evolution in a microbe-rich world, rely on certain exposures to calibrate themselves. Disrupt those exposures, as we have through modern medicine, food and lifestyle, and things go haywire."

"Velasquez-Manoff: We know tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, came out of Africa with us. It’s been in the human body for at least 60,000 years, and probably longer. But beginning in the late 18th century, there was a wave of TB in Europe, and nobody has ever really been able to explain it. Some people argue that a more virulent strain emerged, and there is some evidence for that when they look at the genetics of it. But there’s another hypothesis.

According to this, we had to acquire immunity to tuberculosis because of constant exposure to non-parasitic versions of mycobacteria that basically live in soil. But Europe begins to urbanize in the 18th century. The potato is imported from the Americas, causes a population boom, and people start migrating to cities. They lose the mycobacteria in the natural setting. And without that exposure, immune systems didn’t know how to react to it."

"Wired: Why is our exposure to parasites and microbes so different now than it was 100 years ago, or 500 years ago?

Velasquez-Manoff: Let’s imagine people living in a rural environment, with lots of animals around. That’s the first thing that’s different. We were constantly exposed to each others’ fecal microbes: Feces was on our hands, and we fertilized our crops with it. People were fermenting food or drying it.
Today’s processed food is designed not to carry microbes. It’s full of salt and sugar and grease. You’ve seen those photos of McDonald’s hamburgers kept for a year or two that don’t rot: Microbes can’t get a foothold in them."

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/09/epidemic-of-absence/

Erstaunlich. Dies und noch viel mehr steht alles schon in "Mensch G.M.B.H." und "Die letzte Chance" und findet heutzutage eine immer detailliertere Begründung.

Und Humus und ein "natürlich" belassener Boden spielen dabei eine eine weitere wichtige Rolle.


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Mensch G.M.B.H.
BeitragVerfasst: Mi 21. Nov 2012, 14:38 
Offline

Registriert: Sa 31. Jul 2010, 20:22
Beiträge: 598
Allen Anschein fördert der menschliche Darm gezielt bestimmte Mikroben, um sich vor anderen zu schützen. Siehe:
http://www.n-tv.de/wissen/Darm-foerdert ... 06526.html


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Mensch G.M.B.H.
BeitragVerfasst: So 6. Jan 2013, 00:17 
Offline

Registriert: Sa 31. Jul 2010, 20:22
Beiträge: 598
700 Mikrobenarten wurden in der menschlichen Erstlingsmilch gefunden.

http://www.n-tv.de/wissen/Muttermilch-i ... 93716.html

Die Natur weiß, was sie tut.

Bonne année,

Bernhard


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Mensch G.M.B.H.
BeitragVerfasst: Di 26. Feb 2013, 10:47 
Offline

Registriert: Sa 12. Dez 2009, 18:31
Beiträge: 1215
Artensterben im menschlichen Mund

Florian Rötzer 26.02.2013

Nach Genanalysen haben sich Bakteriengemeinschaften mit der Entwicklung der Landwirtschaft verändert, seit der industriellen Revolution haben die Karies verursachenden Bakterien die Vorherrschaft übernommen
Kultureller Fortschritt kostet seinen Preis. Verändert werden durch neue Lebensweisen und Techniken nicht nur Gesellschaft, Verhalten und Umwelt, sondern mitunter auch der menschliche Körper. Der passt sich den neuen Bedingungen an oder eröffnet als Wirt neue Möglichkeiten der Kolonisierung. Die Zahl der Mitbewohner des menschlichen Körpers ist bekanntlich weit höher als die Zahl der menschlichen Zellen, Bakteriengemeinschaften unterscheiden sich je nach Individuum und auch nach Lebensweise. Über die Evolution der Mitbewohner ist aber noch wenig bekannt. Einen möglichen Zusammenhang der evolutionären Veränderung der Bakteriengemeinschaften in der Mundhöhle glauben nun australische und britische Wissenschaftler gefunden zu haben, wie sie in der Zeitschrift Nature Genetics berichten.

http://www.heise.de/tp/artikel/38/38642/1.html

"Der moderne Mund existiert grundsätzlich in einem permanenten Zustand der Krankheit."

Das erinnert mich an den permanenten halbfaulen Zustand der modernen Äcker ..

Erstaunlich - oder eigentlich garnicht:

Mit der Veränderung unserer Ernährung hat die Zusammensetzung der Mikroorganismen im Mund sich verändert und ihre Vielfalt abgenommen ..

Also doch: ungewaschene Wildpflanzen essen !

Die Regale unserer Lebensmittelgeschäfte sind voll mit einer ungeheuren bunten Vielfalt der unterschiedlichsten Verpackungen und Behältnisse mit immer dem gleichen Inhalt : vorverarbeitetes Getreide.

Ancient Teeth Bacteria Record Disease Evolution

Monday February 18, @02:09AM
from the you-are-what-you-eat dept.

"DNA preserved in calcified bacteria on the teeth of ancient human skeletons has shed light on the health consequences of the evolving diet and behavior from the Stone Age to the modern day. The ancient genetic record reveals the negative changes in oral bacteria brought about by the dietary shifts as humans became farmers, and later with the introduction of food manufacturing in the Industrial Revolution."

http://science.slashdot.org/story/13/02 ... -evolution


Ancient Teeth Bacteria Record Disease Evolution

"The modern mouth basically exists in a permanent disease state."

Feb 17, 2013 02:53 PM EST

DNA preserved in calcified bacteria on the teeth of ancient human skeletons has shed light on the health consequences of the evolving diet and behaviour from the Stone Age to the modern day.

The ancient genetic record reveals the negative changes in oral bacteria brought about by the dietary shifts as humans became farmers, and later with the introduction of food manufacturing in the Industrial Revolution.

An international team, led by the University of Adelaide's Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD) where the research was performed, has published the results in Nature Genetics today. Other team members include the Department of Archaeology at the University of Aberdeen and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge (UK).

"This is the first record of how our evolution over the last 7500 years has impacted the bacteria we carry with us, and the important health consequences," says study leader Professor Alan Cooper, ACAD Director.

"Oral bacteria in modern man are markedly less diverse than historic populations and this is thought to contribute to chronic oral and other disease in post-industrial lifestyles."

The researchers extracted DNA from tartar (calcified dental plaque) from 34 prehistoric northern European human skeletons, and traced changes in the nature of oral bacteria from the last hunter-gatherers, through the first farmers to the Bronze Age and Medieval times.

"Dental plaque represents the only easily accessible source of preserved human bacteria," says lead author Dr Christina Adler, who conducted the research while a PhD student at the University of Adelaide, now at the University of Sydney.

"Genetic analysis of plaque can create a powerful new record of dietary impacts, health changes and oral pathogen genomic evolution, deep into the past."

Professor Cooper says: "The composition of oral bacteria changed markedly with the introduction of farming, and again around 150 years ago. With the introduction of processed sugar and flour in the Industrial Revolution, we can see a dramatically decreased diversity in our oral bacteria, allowing domination by caries-causing strains. The modern mouth basically exists in a permanent disease state."

Professor Cooper has been working on the project with archaeologist and co-Leader Professor Keith Dobney, now at the University of Aberdeen, for the past 17 years. Professor Dobney says: "I had shown tartar deposits commonly found on ancient teeth were dense masses of solid calcified bacteria and food, but couldn't identify the species of bacteria. Ancient DNA was the obvious answer."

However, the team was not able to sufficiently control background levels of bacterial contamination until 2007 when ACAD's ultra-clean laboratories and strict decontamination and authentication protocols became available. The research team is now expanding its studies through time, and around the world, including other species such as Neandertals.

http://www.hngn.com/articles/1322/20130217/ancient-teeth-bacteria-record-disease-evolution.htm

Dazu paßt:

Annie France-Harrar; Mensch G.M.B.H.

Inhalt: Die Mikroorganismen in uns und auf uns - unverzichtbar.

Hier zum Download:

http://stiftung-france.de/forum/viewtopic.php?f=33&t=43&sid=cf86c96b564d32bfdfa9530853dea754

und mit Diskussion und weiteren Infos.


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Mensch G.M.B.H.
BeitragVerfasst: Mo 6. Mai 2013, 21:03 
Offline

Registriert: Sa 31. Jul 2010, 20:22
Beiträge: 598
Jetzt auf N24: Mikrokosmos Mensch - was in uns lebt. 22:05 Uhr, 6.5.2013


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Mensch G.M.B.H.
BeitragVerfasst: Mo 26. Mai 2014, 19:10 
Offline

Registriert: Sa 12. Dez 2009, 18:31
Beiträge: 1215
Jetzt wieder zum Download verfügbar


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Mensch G.M.B.H.
BeitragVerfasst: Fr 1. Aug 2014, 08:23 
Offline

Registriert: Sa 12. Dez 2009, 18:31
Beiträge: 1215
Cheeese!

Scientists Uncover a Surprising World of Microbes in Cheese Rind

"..scientists recently brought 137 cheeses from 10 countries into Dutton’s lab at Harvard University for genetic analysis."

Bild

"The rind of good cheese is a thriving microbial community. A single gram—a tiny crumb—contains 10 billion microbial cells, a mix of bacteria and fungi that contribute delicious and sometimes funky flavors. But even though humans have been making cheese for thousands of years, we know very little about what all those bugs are and how they interact."

Bild

"demystify the microbial world around us"

http://www.wired.com/2014/07/cheese-rind-microbes/

So schöne Fotos (Mikroskope), so schöne Diagramme, wäre schön wenn man damit auch Erde, Kompost und Humus untersuchen könnte/würde ..


Als nächstes: Milbenkäse in Ostdeutschland und Madenkäse in Italien (Bei letzterem springen die Maden beim Zubeißen aus ihren Löchern). Gibt Videodokumentationen davon.


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Mensch G.M.B.H.
BeitragVerfasst: Mo 20. Apr 2015, 11:30 
Offline

Registriert: Sa 31. Jul 2010, 20:22
Beiträge: 598
Proben von einem bisher unentdeckten Amazonasvolk ergaben, daß sie ein sehr viel größeres Mikrobiom besitzen als Nordamerikaner. Allein im Darm der Waldbewohner leben doppelt so viele Mikrobenarten.
http://www.sueddeutsche.de/gesundheit/m ... -1.2439534


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:  Sortiere nach  
Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 23 Beiträge ]  Gehe zu Seite Vorherige  1, 2

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde


Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 1 Gast


Du darfst keine neuen Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst keine Antworten zu Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht ändern.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht löschen.

Suche nach:
Gehe zu:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Deutsche Übersetzung durch phpBB.de